Montgomery County is putting in extra 5G mobile antennas

Montgomery County is installing additional 5G cellular antennas

Montgomery County Council is one step closer to installing more 5G cellphone antennas – up to nine meters from a residential area.

Montgomery County Council is one step closer to installing more 5G cellphone antennas – up to nine meters from a residential area.

In Potomac, Maryland, Vicki Huo told FOX 5 that she has lived in her home since the 1980s and a cell phone antenna was accidentally installed in front of her house about seven years ago.

A Montgomery County website says the antenna should go across the street.

Huo claims she has fought unsuccessfully for years to get the county and the operator to move the antenna.

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“Ten years ago they didn’t have the right process. And what about, back then they only wanted to install two or 300 surveys. Now they are going to install thousands of surveys. How do you ensure your process is right?” said Huo.

Montgomery County is considering a zoning change that would allow “small” 5G antenna polls as “limited use” 10 feet from a residential area. The mast would have to replace an existing power mast, street lamp mast or an approved parking lot light mast. There would be height and width requirements.

The county gives examples of what this would look like, including these antennas in other areas:

Opponents question health security through antenna exposure and say some are angry. They are also questioning the affordability of 5G antennas. The city of Takoma Park submitted an objection letter, which, among other things, questioned the regulation and inspection.

Proponents say it is needed to meet the growing demand for bandwidth, improve equity and the digital divide as more people use cell phones, self-driving cars, and wireless devices.

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“What ‘ZTA 19-07’ will actually do is make these surveys legal everywhere. In other words, the county has turned away from regulation for years, the county council has ignored this problem for years, saying we are going to make it legal and we are going to keep doing it, ”said Rick Myer of the Montgomery County Coalition for the Control of Cell Towers “.

Proponents say it is needed to meet the growing demand for bandwidth, improve equity and the digital divide as more people use cell phones, self-driving cars, and wireless devices.

Council member Hans Riemer is the main sponsor of the amendment.

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“If we block or ban that, we just won’t have good wireless service in Montgomery County. DC did it. Virginia did it. Prince George did it Riemer.

The Montgomery County memorandum states that Prince George’s County requires “small” 5G antennas of 30 feet. from a house and 50 m from a school. In DC it says it is 10 feet from a building and Fairfax County: 10 feet from a right of way Montgomery County officials say Arlington has no kickback limits.

When FOX 5 asked if 5G antennas were guaranteed, we were told that 4G antennas could also be installed.

Some council members want to hold an official vote before the council’s August break.

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